I Wrote a Story about You

Many of you would rather have a root canal without an anesthetic than embrace a schedule of daily writing.

That is why I have decided to create a new category here on the blog dedicated to writing.  If you think about it, there are only two ways for you to communicate:  writing and talking.  The only means you have of finding new customers and delighting current customers is through writing and talking.

Oh, but Dawn, actions speak louder than words. True.  But I would venture to bet what’s left of the Westerberg 401k that, even though you do fantastic, amazing, business-changing work for your customers, you’ve had to explain it to them.  Explain it verbally and explain it in writing.

So I will be writing on writing.  I am going to share what I do and recommend and I’m going to research and share what others do and recommend.

Writing takes practice.  With practice, awful writing becomes decent writing.  With practice decent writing becomes above average writing.  I know.  I’ve been practice, in earnest, for just under a year because I want this blog to get better and be of service.

The first lesson is while you are developing and practicing your writing skills, select topics that will be sure-fire in their interest to your readers:  write about your customers.

It doesn’t have to be formal.  In fact, I would encourage you to keep it casual and conversational.  Think about a business problem that you and your customer have solved.  There are probably a number of actions and insights of that customer (and your collaboration with them) that other customers will find interesting.  Perhaps it’s the leadership of your customer in keeping other on their team energized and excited about the project.  Maybe the owner you are working with is a great visionary and they are enlisting your services, technology, and the efforts of their team to thrive in a down economy and be well poised to handle increased business with the upturn.  How does your solution help them provide better service to their customers?

You have a wealth of material in each and every customer.

People like reading about themselves.  It’s not that they’re ego maniacs – but it is flattering that someone took the time to reflect and document their goodness or uniqueness or intelligence.

People like reading about other people.  I believe that you are better off showing how someone has used a feature or function and then, in their words, explains how it has helped them and the business.  Characters, specific challenges, actions by specific people mentioned by name, real life – all trump product descriptions, upgrade requirements, and best practices.  Test it out and see.

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